Why am I seeing an old version of an image? - Clearing Your Browser Cache

In order to speed up web browsing, web browsers are designed to download web pages and store all of the files associated with the pages locally on your computer's hard drive in an area called "cache". This cache contains all of the images, JavaScript files, Flash swf files, downloads, cookies and more of every page you visit stored in the Temporary Internet Files folder (for IE on PCs).

When you visit the same page for a second time, the browser speeds up display time by loading the page code and all of the images and referenced file content locally from cache instead of downloading it brand new from the internet. This means that you can possibly see a less than current version of a web pages and this is most often seen when we have updated or replaced an image with a new, updated version but have kept the same file name!

You should periodically clear the cache to allow your browser to function more efficiently, and especially during website design and development projects where you review the same page or site frequently as it is changing and being developed, you must clear your cache frequently by empting the cache or doing a "force refresh" of the content of the page.

If you believe that you have a less than current version of a page, please see the following steps listed below to clear the cache in your browser.

Option One: "Force Refresh"

To perform a forced refresh of the content in a page on a PC in Internet Explorer, browse to the page that you need to refresh, and use the keyboard combination Ctrl + F5. This will perform a forced refresh of this single page to pull down all new images, files and code content for the page on screen.

In most circumstances, this will allow you to see the newest versions of the page and content. If it does not, then please continue to option two and clear the full cache of files saved.

Option Two: Clear Your Browser Cached Files

Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0

  1. Open Internet Explorer.
  2. Click Tools in the upper toolbar or click on the Tools icon.
  3. Click Internet Options to open Internet Properties.
  4. Click the General tab
  5. Click Delete under "Browsing History".
  6. Click Delete Files under "Temporary Internet Files".
  7. Click Yes on the Delete Files dialog box.
  8. Click Close and then OK.

or

  1. Click Start, select Settings and Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Internet Options to open Internet Properties.
  3. Click Delete under "Browsing History".
  4. Click Delete Files under "Temporary Internet Files".
  5. Click Yes on the Delete Files dialog box.
  6. Click Close and then OK.
  7. Close Window.

Direct Microsoft Support Page

Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0

  1. Open Internet Explorer.
  2. Click Tools in the upper toolbar.
  3. Click Internet Options to open Internet Properties.
  4. Click the General tab
  5. Click Delete Files under "Temporary Internet Files".
  6. Check Delete all offline content.
  7. Click OK on the Delete Files dialog box.
  8. Click Apply and then OK.

or

  1. Click Start, select Settings and Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Internet Options to open Internet Properties.
  3. Click Delete Files.
  4. NOTE: Do not select Delete Cookies. Delete Cookies removes all the cookies stored on the computer.
  5. Click OK on the Delete Files dialog box.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Close Window.

Direct Microsoft Support Page

Mozilla Firefox

  1. Click Tools in the upper toolbar and select Options.
  2. Click the Advanced Icon and click the Network tab.
  3. Click Clear Now under the Cache section.
  4. Click Ok.
  5. Exit and re-launch the browser.

Safari 1.0 for Macintosh OS X

  1. Open Safari.
  2. Click on Safari in the upper toolbar and Select Empty Cache.
  3. Click Empty on the Are you sure message box.
  4. Exit and re-launch the browser.

Firefox for Macintosh OS X

  1. Open Firefox
  2. Click on Firefox in the upper toolbar and Select Preferences.
  3. Click the Privacy Icon.
  4. Click Clear across from the Cache option.
  5. Click Ok.
  6. Exit and re-launch the browser.

Another Possibility: Cached Content Within Your IT Network
The final possibility, if a forced refresh and clearing your complete browser cache does not remedy the situation is that your office network might have a special situation with a proxy server or cached content technology in place within your office network. This is done at times to help speed up inner-office usage of similar files when everyone access the same content frequently. Many times the most simple solution in this case (rather than getting your office IT involved!) is for us to change the names of the web page file and referenced images so that your next browsing session will encounter all new files for new caching. Please let us know if this is the case and we'll help out ASAP!